Category Archives: Heart Disease

Turducken On Your Thanksgiving Menu?

© Jacquelyn Johnston, M.Ed. Diabesity Coach

I added a new word to my vocabulary today. The one you see in the title. Turducken. Priceless.

Here in Canada we do Thanksgiving on the second Monday of October, and its history is somewhat different from that of the American one. The Canadian Thanksgiving is a day to give thanks for a bountiful harvest. It’s believed to be a practice brought over to Canada from early European farmers who settled here. They’d fill a curved goat’s horn with grains and fruits. The horn was called a cornucopia, meaning “horn of plenty”, and it symbolized gratitude for a successful growing season.

I’ve been looking at magazines covers in both bookstores and supermarket racks for a few weeks now, and I must say some of the most fabulous food pictures come out in anticipation of Thanksgiving. Even more so than at Christmas, when decoration and glitter surround the seasonal fare. At Thanksgiving the focus seems to be more on the fabulous food and the generous earth it came from.

I was having a lot of fun reading up on the American Thanksgiving when I came across that delectable word “Turducken”– a chicken inside a duck inside a turkey. There’s an on-line demo that shows you how to telescope one inside the other by de-boning each bird first and adding pork stuffing. Fascinating. What really surprised me was that these Tri-Fowls are also widely available in Britain, where Thanksgiving isn’t such a major event.

Apparently, a close cousin to the Turducken is the Turporken, is also available at many places around the country. My dictionary’s getting fatter.

One description of the first American Thanksgiving circa 1620, where settlers sat down for a meal with the First Nations people, was particularly interesting. Apparently, as there was no flour there was neither bread nor not pumpkin pie, as there was no wheat to make them with. The early diners ate turkey with corn and other whole foods.

At this time I know of one group that will be worried if they get invited to Thanksgiving dinner—those with a gluten sensitivity. I was reading a gluten-free cook book in the library yesterday. The writer, who teaches gluten-free cooking, said many people have this sensitivity, even Celiac disease, because our insides have never really adapted to wheat and other gluten-filled foods. Not even after thousands of years of human evolution.

With the popularity of processed, packaged foods we have acquired the practice of eating too much, with disastrous results such as epidemic obesity and diabetes, not to mention heart disease, lung diseases like COPD, and arthritis. Coupled with that, we are thirsty and don’t know it.

Maybe this thanksgiving it would be a good experiment to eat like Celiac sufferers. In fact, I suspect that’s actually the way we all ought to be dining. Hey, find something wrong with eating whole foods! A pioneer meal would have included turkey with the fruits of the earth. Apparently there was lots of pumpkin. Without churning masses of sugar into it. Add pure spring water to this and you have a meal that would make your heart specialist really happy.

Enjoy some Turducken, Turporken, Turshrimpken, Turlambken or even Turbeefken. Go out for a walk two hours before your meal. Don’t “Walk it off”. Not a good idea. Drink a large glass of alkaline water, rest, then sit down to your Thanksgiving dinner. Stop eating as soon as you’re no longer hungry. Your waistline will thank you.

Happy Thanksgiving. May you be blessed with an abundance of all good things.

Jacquelyn

Jacquelyn Johnston M.Ed.
Professional Health Coach and Educator,
Solutions and Support for Optimal Health
www.LifestyleForLongevity.com
www.LoseTwentyPoundsNow.com
Richmond, B.C. Canada
mail to:jj@lifestyleforlongevity.com
Tel. 604.276.8673 Fax. 604.276.8675

Dear God, I pray for the cure of cancer.

© Jacquelyn Johnston, M.Ed. Diabesity Coach

Do you receive requests to pass on this kind of e-mail to 10 people, following which all manner of good things will be showered on you? I get quite a few. Today, I got one with the picture of a burning candle.

You may have seen the one with the woman walking from the left to the right of the screen, with a pink ribbon in the corner. Or the one with a pink T-shirt and a pink ribbon in the middle of the page.

Run for the cure, walk for the cure, Cops for Cancer and others. Now, especially, since Dr.Wayne Dyer was diagnosed with lymphoma, I’m getting quite a few of them both personally and on my Facebook page.

It’s always good when people reach out to people who have had such a diagnosis. Or when people just reach out. I’m all for outreach.

That being said, I had a few thoughts this morning. Some of these activities do raise a lot of money, but to what end, I ask myself. If the aim is to raise money for the existing Cancer-related model, I’m not sure I see the point. You raise the money, you give it to existing agencies which have been working to zap cancers with powerful drugs, subsidizing a model that hasn’t worked for a century.

Now, the people who do these activities are fabulous. The cops, for instance. They get on their bikes and do a circuit like the Tour de France, only it’s a Tour de Vancouver. It’s a little shorter and stunningly scenic, and they raise the moolah. Cheerfully, enthusiastically, garnering considerable support along the way.

The women who do the 60-kilometre walk camp overnight at various checkpoints. They have a rollicking good time chatting, and huddling in tents with hot chocolate. That’s a lot of effort in support of a failed model.

What if we added one word to these activities: how does Run for Cancer Prevention, Walk for Cancer Prevention, Cops for Cancer Prevention, Wear pink for Cancer Prevention sound to you?

What if we had Whole Foods Only Day, Zero Processed Food Day, Eat your fresh greens Day, Drink Micro-clustered Water Day, and the like. What if all those runners doing fund-raisers were to channel their energies into the activities that we know contribute to cancer prevention and cancer treatment? Or diabetes prevention?

Take Richmond’s own Mary Gazetas, for example. This dynamo of a community giver (and what a giver!) has organized many terrific projects here in Richmond, including a Fruit Tree Sharing Project. This is an amazingly thoughtful venture where produce is grown and distributed fresh to the Food Bank. (Alas, we have one in Richmond too).

Strikes me if more people ate this way there would be a lot less cancer, diabetes, obesity, heart and kidney disease, liver and lung disease, arthritis and skin conditions…you get my drift?

The papers are still full of the H1N1 non-event.

Could it be we’re really supposed to spend more time on what’s really endemic? On remedies that have worked for thousands of years? On what doesn’t have savage side-effects? What benefit is there to a system that essentially makes every discomfort a disease that has a matching pharmaceutical?

Join me. I’m going out to walk for prevention. What do you think?

Jacquelyn

Jacquelyn
Jacquelyn Johnston M.Ed.
Professional Health Coach and Educator,
Solutions and Support for Optimal Health
Richmond, B.C. Canada

http://www.LifestyleForLongevity.com

http://www.LoseTwentyPoundsNow.com

mail to:jj@lifestyleforlongevity.com
Tel. 604.276.8673 Fax. 604.276.8675

No Toes? No Probs.

© Jacquelyn Johnston, M.Ed.

I’ve been wondering why, in the face of clear evidence, people stil let obesity take over their lives. Even when that extra weight is clearly a precursor of diabesity, which is the combo of obesity and diabetes, heart disease, kidney problems, amputation…and more.

At a seminar the other day I heard that denial was the perfect system. Could it be that we humans set it up to help ourselves deal with issues we’d rather not face? That, by the way, was a rhetorical question.

Have you seen that prime-time ad on TV where a guy gets into an elevator only to find himself in the company of a talking gorilla—an 800-pound one, of course? For those of you who don’t watch TV, the gorilla knows his human acquaintance hasn’t got his retirement funds sorted out, so he tells him what would happen if he did, at the same time implying what would happen if he kept pushing it aside.

Well, it’s the same with diabesity—I speak on the topic and I also observe this in people I know. Rob weighs 250 pounds and has diabetes. The doctor told him he would get gout and lose his toes if he didn’t lose some of that weight and stop eating fast food every day. (That’s 7 days a week) Rob kept up his visits to the fast food outlet, and in 2007, lost one right toe.

It was a horrific shock, but at Christmas 2008 Rob had his second foot operation, and is now hobbling around with three toes on the right foot, and some of the toes on the left foot are beginning to turn colour. Know the connection between that and diabetes?

Rob is still chomping on burgers and fries, washed down with root beer, and often beer of the more high-octane variety, which he drinks like water. He’s been warned about heart attacks, but he jokes that his heart is well-protected by all his layers of –ahem– tissue. Wonder what’s in store?

Need we even wonder? What would you tell Rob is you had a chance? Take a look at my free report, which you can download from this page and make a list of 5 things if you can. Need further info? Feel free to contact me at jj@lifestyleforlongevity.com. I’ll be glad to give you a free 30-minute strategy session, especially if there are any Robs in your life.

Cheers for now,

Jacquelyn

Jacquelyn Johnston M.Ed.
Professional Health Coach and Educator,
Solutions and Support for Optimal Health

Whether you need to lose those pesky 20 pounds,
work on prevention or regain health, I can help.
Call me. 604.276.8673

www.LifestyleForLongevity.com
www.LoseTwentyPoundsNow.com
Richmond, B.C. Canada
mail to:jj@lifestyleforlongevity.com
Tel. 604.276.8673 Fax. 604.276.8675